Fun stuff from The Magic Morning Show

by Mower on July 3, 2014

in Front Page News,Morning Show Fun

 

Woman’s Random Act Of Kindness Goes Viral

Katie Kanefke went to the store hoping the store would price match all four cases of diapers she wanted to buy, but nearly left three of them when she was told they could only match one. When 73-year-old Carol Flynn saw Kanefke with only one box, she took the rest and said she was going to pay the $120 for them. Kanefke told the Argus Leader that she was shocked and kept saying, “Thank you and God Bless you.” Flynn told Kanefke that she knew one day she’d want to pay it forward.

 

Mexican Fireworks Being Confiscated At The Border

The U.S. Border Patrol has once again been seizing Mexican-made fireworks. They say the explosives are illegal in many states because they have substandard packaging and charges that detonate too quickly. In Tultepec, Mexico, 6,000 residents work at a fireworks factory that makes its explosives by stuffing diesel fuel, powdered charcoal and rocket fuel into cartridges made out of old cornmeal and dog food sacks.

 

Want to Stop Using All Those Exclamation Points? Here’s How

Anyone who gets texts or email — which means, pretty much everybody — can’t help but having noticed it: exclamation points are everywhere. What once was a punctuation mark used a lot more sparingly is now used after nearly every sentence, and often in multiples of two, three or even more. You’re likely to be guilty of it yourself. Grammarians tie the ubiquity of the exclamation point to the rise of electronic communication, in which it’s harder to get the tone across of what you’re saying. Time magazine has some suggestions of what we can use to replace the exclamation point, trying to return it to its former use at the end of statements that really demand it.

  • Use an emoticon instead — “Sure :)” instead of “Sure!”
  • Use intensifiers or emphatic words — “Thank you very much” or “Thank you so much” instead of “Thank you!”
  • Use less expected words — “You’re a gem and a half”
  • Use other forms of punctuation for emphasis — “Thank you, very much.” or “You. Are. The. Best.”

 

40 Percent of Americans Don’t Take All Their Vacation Time

Not everyone in America gets vacation time, since we’re the only developed country that doesn’t mandate some time off, but a new Oxford Economics analysis found that of those Americans who do get vacation, 40 percent of them don’t take all the days, according to Bloomberg. These people leave any average of 8.1 days unused, for a total nationally of some 429 million unused vacation days each year that, unless the workers are compensated for days they don’t take, amount to a gift to their employers. Why aren’t people taking all the time off they’re entitled to? Part of it’s the belief some Americans seem to have that they’re somehow slacking if they take days off, but a main reason is they’re trying to increase the chances of getting a raise or promotion or even just holding on to their jobs, particularly in the recent years of the Great Recession and weak economic recovery. Bloomberg reports, however, that according to managers, human resources professionals and behavioral economists, vacation time makes people happier, healthier and more productive at work.

 

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